Optimizing Ad Groups with Google’s Remove Redundant Keywords Recommendation

If you’re a digital marketer or business owner, you know the importance of using keywords to reach the right audience and drive relevant traffic to your website/ads. It is very important to use keywords effectively in order to avoid overloading your content with unnecessary repetition. However, it can be challenging to stay up-to-date with the latest changes and best practices in the world of search engine marketing or paid advertising.

Recently, Google made a significant change to its “Remove redundant keywords” recommendation, which could have a big impact on the way you use keywords in your campaigns.

In the past, it was common practice to stuff as many keywords as possible into a single ad group in order to increase the chances of your ads being shown to the right audience. Previously, the “Remove redundant keywords” recommendation suggested removing unnecessary or repetitive words or phrases within the same ad group. However, Google’s algorithms have become much smarter at detecting and penalizing this type of behavior. They have updated this recommendation to prefer broad match keywords over phrase match or exact match keywords.

What does this mean?

Broad match keywords are the most general type of keyword match, and they allow your ads to be shown to users who are searching for a wide range of related terms. For example, if your broad match keyword is “dog food,” your ads might be shown to users who are searching for “organic dog food,” “grain-free dog food,” or “best dog food for small breeds.”

On the other hand, phrase match keywords are a little more specific, and they allow your ads to be shown to users who are searching for a specific phrase. For example, if your phrase match keyword is “organic dog food,” your ads might be shown to users who are searching for “organic dog food for small breeds,” but not to users who are searching for “best organic dog food.”

Exact match keywords are the most specific type of keyword match, and they allow your ads to be shown to users who are searching for a specific word or phrase. For example, if your exact match keyword is “organic dog food,” your ads will only be shown to users who are searching for that exact phrase.

How can you implement?

According to Google, “Remove redundant keywords” means avoiding the use of unnecessary or repetitive words or phrases within the same ad group. This can help improve the relevance and quality of your ads, as well as the user experience. This means using a variety of different keywords and phrases to describe your topic, rather than repeating the same ones over and over again.

So, how can you implement this recommendation and create more effective ad groups? Here are a few tips:

  1. Use a variety of relevant keywords: Instead of using the same keyword or phrase multiple times, try using a variety of different keywords and phrases to describe your products or services. This can help you reach a wider audience and ensure that your ads are shown to the most relevant users.
  2. Use negative keywords: Negative keywords are words or phrases that you do not want your ads to show for. For example, if you’re selling dog food, you might want to use “cat” as a negative keyword to prevent your ads from being shown to people searching for cat food. This can help improve the relevance of your ads and ensure that you are only reaching the most relevant audience.
  3. Use long-tail keywords: Long-tail keywords are more specific and targeted than short-tail keywords. For example, “dog food” is a short-tail keyword, while “organic grain-free dog food for small breeds” is a long-tail keyword. Using long-tail keywords can help you reach a more specific and relevant audience and improve the effectiveness of your ad campaigns.

Why is it important? 

Under the new “Remove redundant keywords” recommendation, Google will remove a phrase match or exact match keyword if it is covered by a broad match keyword. This means that if you have both a broad match keyword and a phrase match keyword that are targeting the same search terms, Google will only keep the broad match keyword and remove the phrase match keyword.

So, why is Google making this change? The main reason is to improve the user experience and the relevance of search results. By using broad match keywords, Google is able to show users a wider range of relevant ads, rather than limiting them to a specific phrase or word.

However, this change also has implications for advertisers. If you have been relying on phrase match or exact match keywords to target specific search terms, you may see a decrease in the performance of your campaigns. On the other hand, if you have been using broad match keywords, you may see an increase in the performance of your campaigns.

Overall, it’s important to stay up-to-date with the latest changes and recommendations from Google and to adjust your keyword strategies accordingly. By focusing on creating high-quality, relevant, and useful content for your users, you can help improve the performance of your campaigns and drive more relevant traffic to your website.

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